Category Archives: Writing samples

Examples of different writing styles.

Digitization for conservators (2017)

A guest lecture for the Preservation of Books, Photos and Archival Material’s course (SCIE0047) in Fleming College’s Cultural Heritage Conservation and Management program, (session instructor Laura Cunningham) on June 16, 2017.

Download the slides for this lecture.

Suggested readings

Overview of the digitization process

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) has published one of the best quick overviews of how to set up a digitization programme that I have seen.

Thinking about how to save your information and documents for the long term is a good way to start thinking about digital preservation in general. This next resource frames the problem and discusses it systematically and in clear language.

About images (less technical)

Copyright

  • Murray, L.J. and S.E. Trusow. Canadian copyright : a citizen’s guide (2nd ed.). Toronto : Between the Lines, c2013. 304 p. ISBN 9781771130134
    • Using examples, case studies and very accessible language, this book explains Canadian copyright law to ordinary Canadians and how Canadian copyright law and policy affects them.
    • The second edition is revised to include the recent changes to the Act and important Supreme Court decisions on user rights. Very easy to read. Includes specific cases (for example, libraries, archives and museums). HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.

Digitization (general)

Digital preservation (a very complex topic)

Digitization standards

I include these so that you can see a sample of what they look like.

Metadata

Digitization for Conservators (2016)

A guest lecture for the Preservation of Books, Photos and Archival Material’s course (SCIE0047) in Fleming College’s Cultural Heritage Conservation and Management program, (session instructor Laura Cunningham).

Download the slides for this lecture.

Suggested readings

Overview of the digitization process

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) has published one of the best quick overviews of how to set up a digitization programme that I have seen.

Thinking about how to save your information and documents for the long term is a good way to start thinking about digital preservation in general.

About images (less technical)

Canadian copyright

  • Murray, L.J. and S.E. Trusow. Canadian copyright : a citizen’s guide (2nd ed.). Toronto : Between the Lines, c2013. 304 p. ISBN 9781771130134
  • Using examples, case studies and very accessible language, this book explains Canadian copyright law to ordinary Canadians and how Canadian copyright law and policy affects them. The second edition is revised to include the recent changes to the Act and important Supreme Court decisions on user rights. Very easy to read. Includes specific cases (for example, libraries, archives and museums). HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.

Digitization (general)

Digital preservation (a very complex topic)

Digitization standards (so you can see a sample of what they look like)

Metadata

Digitization for conservators (2015)

 

A guest lecture for the Preservation of Books, Photos and Archival Material’s course ( SCIE0047) in Fleming College’s Cultural Heritage Conservation and Management program.

Download the slides for this lecture.

Suggested readings

About images (less technical)

Copyright

  • Murray, L.J. and S.E. Trusow. Canadian copyright : a citizen’s guide (2nd ed.). Toronto : Between the Lines, c2013. 304 p. ISBN 9781771130134
  • Using examples, case studies and very accessible language, this book explains Canadian copyright law to ordinary Canadians and how Canadian copyright law and policy affects them. The second edition is revised to include the recent changes to the Act and important Supreme Court decisions on user rights. Very easy to read. Includes specific cases (for example, libraries, archives and museums). HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.

Digitization (general)

Digital preservation (a very complex topic)

Digitization standards (so you can see a sample of what they look like)

Metadata

Closure of the Consumer Health Information Service

I did not write the post that follows, however it was a sad day for all of us and I want to ensure that this post survives.

The Consumer Health Information Service at the Toronto Public Library provided invaluable assistance to Ontarians across the province, in both official languages, helping them to find reliable health information that they could understand.

CHIS began in a very much pre-Internet era, a testament to good, old-fashioned librarianship and dedication to service. Susan Murray, the heart of consumer health information at TPL and in Canada in general, was the driving force behind a comprehensive and proactive information service that it was a privilege to be part of. Susan’s mission was and remains the provision of health information people can understand, exactly when and where they need it. To fulfill that mission, Susan literally moved mountains. Continue reading

Locating reliable health information on the Internet

Can you trust Internet health information?

More and more, people are using the Internet to find information on all topics, including health information. A recent article  by the PEW Internet & American Life Project estimates that 75-80% of Internet users have searched for health information online, and that most reported high levels of satisfaction with the information they found.

That said, not all sites on the Internet provide reliable health information. And, as Mark Twain famously said: “Be careful about reading health books. You may die of a misprint”.

Libraries can help you locate reliable health information on the Internet, by providing classes, electronic resources or by answering your questions in person or online. There are also a number of sites you can check to see if that alarming e-mail you just read is a hoax or fraud.

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Colorectal cancer: Cancer of the colon or rectum

March is colorectal cancer awareness month.

What is colorectal cancer?Support-colorectal-cancer_mod
Colorectal or colon cancer, which affects the last six feet of the small intestines and rectum, is one of the most common type of cancer in Canada.

Overall, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer (men and women combined). On average, 413 Canadians will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer every week, and 171 Canadians will die of it. (source)

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Teens in Canada: Sex, contraception, pregnancy and STDs

Are Canadian teens having sex?

Of course they are!

CondomThe latest available StatsCan report about sex, condom-use and STDs among young people in Canada was published in 2005. The study looked at youth aged 15 to 25, finding that about 62% of young people in this age category had had sex at least once in their lives. The proportion was the same among males and females, and once they began sexual activity most remained sexually active.

Of course, the older the young people were the more likely they were to have had sex: 28% of 15-17 year-olds stated they were sexually active, compared to 65% of 18-19 year-olds and 80% of 20-24 year olds. The average age at first sexual intercourse for both males and females was 16.5 years. The survey found that older people were more likely to have long-term, monogamous relationships and that youth aged 15 to 19 were more likely to have had multiple partners in the past year.

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Alzheimer’s disease: What is it and can it be prevented?

© Flowers Florist Link 2009 By J.O.E. Innovations.This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5 License. First described in 1906 by German psychologist Alois Alzheimer, Alzheimer’s disease is incurable, degenerative and fatal. It attacks the brain and it is the most common cause of dementia. It is most commonly diagnosed in people over 65, although early-onset Alzheimer’s can occur much earlier.

Prevalence

Over 300,000 Canadians suffer from some type of dementia, over 60% of these have been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease (source). The government estimates that, by the year 2031 — when most Baby Boomers will reach 60 — over 750,000 Canadians will suffer from dementia. (more Canadian statistics)

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